The Amateur Library

Author:

Edward Said

Publish Date:

1993

External Link

In his fourth Reith Lecture, Edward Said examines the possibility of amateur intellectuals and their influence on society. He explores the notion of the ‘non-academic intellectual’ and considers some of the current pressures on intellectuals to be marketable and uncontroversial as well as in areas of specialisation, political correctness and authority.

Author:

Céline Condorelli and Avery F. Gordon

Publish Date:

Céline Condorelli asked Avery Gordon to have a conversation about friendship. Céline has studied the subject while Avery has not and so in what follows Avery is thinking aloud as she goes and Céline is more reserved. The conversation took place in Avery’s kitchen overlooking the garden on a sunny winter day in California. At the end, Avery promised to do some proper study and then talk again. Céline continues to try different ways of tackling the issue. The conversation was transcribed by Maryam Griffin and Céline and has been edited by Avery and Céline.

Author:

Joana Hadjithomas and Khalil Joreige

Publish Date:

2013

It begins with an image we discover in a book. The image is of a stamp with a rocket on it. The rocket bears the colors of the Lebanese flag – an image we don’t recognize, we don’t understand. It does not belong to our imaginary

Author:

Anthony Huberman

Publish Date:

If an institution goes from knowing to caring, it could point to the affective relationship that ties people to ideas and become a place for attachment rather than consumption. After all, the ideas that make us curious are not the ones we fully understand, but the ones we care about – I Love It is always more compelling than I Get It.

Author:

Anthony Huberman

Publish Date:

Let us imagine a different code of conduct, a new ethics of behavior, where winning matters less than wandering. Following the Swiss artists Peter Fischli & David Weiss’s notorious mascots into the wilderness, we are now entering The Age of Rat and Bear.

Author:

Hito Steyerl

Publish Date:

2011

Lets start with a simple proposition: what used to be work has increasingly been turned into occupation.

Author:

Jan Verwoert

Publish Date:

2008

How can we address the current changes in our societies and lives? Some say that we have come to inhabit the post-industrial condition —but what does that mean? One thing seems certain: after the disappearance of manual labour from the lives of most people in the Western world, we have entered into a culture where we no longer just work, we perform.

Author:

Anton Vidokle

Publish Date:

2009

It seems to me that art resides within and in between subjects, and subjects don’t always require work to produce themselves. For example, falling in love, or having a religious or aesthetic experience does not require work, so why should art require work to come into being?

Author:

Anton Vidokle

Publish Date:

2013

What does being professional actually mean under the current conditions of de-skilling in art? We should probably be less concerned with being full-time, art-school-trained, professional artists, writers, or curators – less concerned with measuring our artistic worth in these ways. Since most of us are not expected to perfect any specific techniques or master any craft – unlike athletes or classical musicians, for example – and given that we are no longer tied to working in specific mediums, perhaps it’s fine to be a part-time artist?

Author:

Otto von Busch & Karl Palmås

Publish Date:

2006

In this publication, Otto von Busch describes “hacktivism” in an abstract sense, relating it to phenomena such as shopdropping, craftivism, fan fiction, liberation theology, and Spanish social movement YOMANGO. Similarly, Karl Palmås examines how publications like Adbusters Magazine, as well as business theorists, have adopted a computer-inspired worldview, linking this development to the dot.com boom of the late 1990s.